Tag Archives | Viral

Kia Gives YouTube Five Hours of Adriana Lima

Adriana Lima Kia

Of all the things I’ve seen companies do to hype their Super Bowl commercial this year, I think Kia’s is the most interesting.

While the spot itself is great, and features the entertaining mix of Adriana Lima, Chuck Liddell and Motley Crue:

It’s actually the video that appeared in the YouTube sidebar while I was watching this spot that caught me by surprise:

What you’re looking at is a video titled “5 Hours of Adriana Lima” that just features a five hour long loop of slow motion b-roll footage of Adriana Lima waving a checkered flag.

While a video like this (an endless loop of eye candy) is common on YouTube, the fact that this video was created by Kia’s official YouTube channel, and not by some random YouTube user that was hoping for a few extra views, shows that Kia actually understands the YouTube audience in a way that few brands manage.

We live in a remix culture, and while it might surprise you that a video like Nyan Cat can get 62 million views, what should really surprise you is that the same video, but slightly tweaked and re-released as “Nyan Cat – OMEGA Extended Edition [3 AND 1/2 HOURS OF NYAN SPLENDIDNESS]” can get 4.8 million views, and that the same video, but again slightly tweaked and re-released as “Nyan Cat 100 HOURS” can get 3.7 million views.

Want more?

A remix of the remix, called “Nyan Troll – 10 hour edition“, just crossed the million view milestone.

Crazy, isn’t it?

While I’m sure the number of people who have watched these videos from beginning to end can be counted on a single hand, these videos exist because people love to feel like they’re part of an ‘in crowd’ that understands the humor in a 100 hour long remix of a dancing rainbow cat.

But don’t underestimate the value of these people.

They are the viewers that will send videos like this to every one of their friends, because they want to challenge them to watch it, and though no one will, they’ll all laugh together at the silliness of it all.

They are the taste makers and the viral creators, and they can drive a tremendous amount of traffic to a video if they get a quick laugh and want to share that laugh with others.

Kia Adriana Lima

Surprisingly, Kia seems to understand that behavior more than any other brand, and so they developed content that caters specifically to it. And again, I’m sure the percentage of viewers that will watch more than a few minutes of Adriana Lima’s flag waving performance is extremely small, but that’s not the point.

The point is that users will have a quick laugh, share it with their friends, and help get the Kia brand in front of more eyes than videos that cost hundreds of thousands of dollars more to produce ever manage.

Sure, the value of each individual viewer might be extremely low, and only a small percentage will even remember that Kia brought them the Adriana Lima video in the first place, but considering the cost to produce the video (setting aside the fact that it was shot while filming a spot that did cost at least a million dollars to produce) and the time it probably took to loop together a five second clip into a five hour video, I’d say it was time and money well spent.

Carl’s Jr. Uses YouTube Stars For Online Video Success

Carl's Jr. Portobello Mushroom Six Dollar Burger

One of my advertising rules of thumb is this: Content that works well online is not the same as content that works well on television.

To see why, let’s look at Carl’s Jr.’s latest ad campaign for their Portobello Mushroom Six Dollar Burger.

First, their television commercial:

Next, one of the videos created for their online campaign:

See the difference?

While their heavily produced, perfectly scripted, hero-shot filled 30-second commercial managed to acquire more than a quarter million views in under a week, less than 200 people rated the video during that time, and less than 500 commented on it, indicating that a very low percentage of those quarter million viewers were actually engaged by the video. (Plus, their previous videos have around a thousand views or less, so I’m guessing most of the Portobello Mushroom Six Dollar Burger’s quarter million views were bought and paid for though an ad buy.) By contrast, the second video, created by one of YouTube’s top users named NigaHiga, acquired more than a million views in under a week, nearly 20,000 ratings, and more than 16,000 commentst, indicating a HUGE amount of engagement.

So what did Carl’s Jr. do right?

  1. Create original content – Instead of trying to push existing assets online with banner ads and video buys, a smart company will reach out to prominent users and elicit their help with creating original content that will appeal to that user’s existing fanbase. The resulting videos might not have the highest production quality, or may stray from the strict brand guidelines from time to time, but they will be done in a style that the online community has come to expect, and will be an open and honest interpretation of the product by the creator, rather than the company speaking through a hired personality.
  2. Involve the viewer – If online content is good, viewers will often want to emulate the campaign with creative of their own, so smart companies will encourage that response and find ways of compensating users that go above and beyond to engage with the brand by creating videos of their own. In this case, each sponsored video ended with a call out by the star to the viewers to encourage them to make their own ‘How do you eat yours?’ video. As a result, while most pure UGC campaigns require a huge prize or some other promise of fame and fortune to get a response, this campaign is fueled by viewers’ desire to relate to the personality behind the video, and the compensation is the fact that the star might actually see the video response. A UGC video response campaign also doesn’t have to cost a lot when using YouTube, since the site’s built-in video response feature and viral sharing tools mean the backend is already in place for a campaign with little to no effort required from the sponsor company.
  3. Use the toolsYouTube provides built-in tools for creating and spreading a message, and smart companies will make sure any online video campaign uses them to the fullest. For one, each video should be embeddable. It sounds obvious, but there is still the occasional video that gets put online by a company that can’t be embedded into other sites, and it’s just a waste of potential free media. Second, smart companies will establish a way for viewers to integrate their own content quickly and easily into the overall campaign. Whether it’s posting video responses to campaign videos or tagging their own videos with a specific keyword, giving users the ability to contribute will do a lot to increase the viral spread of a campaign idea. Lastly, tools like the ‘Favorites’ area of a brand’s channel and Flash video viewers allow a company to separate videos into unique campaigns and make it easy to do a lot with a little.
  4. Start from the top – If the budget is big enough, there’s a lot of value in going after the biggest online stars you can find and afford. In this case, Carl’s Jr. got a few of the top 10 most subscribed to YouTube stars to create a video, and the results speak for themselves: After less than a week, each video had an average of 250,000 views, with some receiving more than a million. It might be tempting to save a few bucks by going after the up and coming stars, but there’s a reason certain content producers have so many subscribers, and that’s usually because they consistently make quality videos that others want to watch.
  5. Give creative freedomToo often, companies get online stars involved in their campaigns and then limit what they can say and do, or try too hard to keep them on brand. The main problem with this is that viewers can usually tell when a message is heavily controlled, and views, pass-along and overall engagement will decrease dramatically as a result. Second, the popular YouTube users are popular for a reason, and they will know what their fans want and what works best, so why try to reinvent the wheel? By giving the content creators more creative control, the videos will be more original and more unique, the views will be higher, and the costs associated with trying to control the message will be much, much lower.

As far as online video campaigns go, the Carl’s Jr. Portobello Mushroom Six Dollar Burger campaign was a complete success. They got a number of top users to create content, that content has generated a high amount of engagement, and viewer response has been very positive overall. Sure, it’s not the flashiest campaign, and it’s definitely not the most expensive, but when the results can speak for themselves, who can doubt the power of a well-run online video campaign?

The Good:

  • Uses existing cewebrities to tap into existing communities and create content that is specifically targeted to the online audience.
  • Engages the viewer and encourages participation.
  • Uses existing YouTube tools to their fullest, which extends the campaign while keeping costs down.
  • Offers an online only coupon to try out the product, giving viewers an exclusive offer and connecting the campaign to actual sales.

The Bad:

  • Some of the videos are a bit on the quirky side, and may catch unaware viewers and those that aren’t used to web content by surprise.

The Future:

  • Brands use existing online personalities to give their campaigns life and guarantee initial success.

YouTube – Carl’s Jr.

Dunlop Loops Its Way To Video Success

Dunlop Loop-the-Loop

Tire ads aren’t known for being fun or sexy, and usually rely on safety stats and a general feeling of ‘that tire won’t explode while I’m driving’ to motivate you to buy. It doesn’t have to be that way however, and Dunlop’s recent campaign is just one example of what’s possible. In their spot, they take an unconventional approach to tire advertising, and highlight the fact that, while tires aren’t typically sexy, the cars that use them sure can be.

In the ad, a stunt driver named Steve Truglia in a Dunlop equipped Toyota Yaris navigates up, over and through a 40 foot loop-the-loop, setting a new world record for the largest loop ever performed by a four wheeled vehicle, and proving that Dunlop tires can easily handle the stresses of a 6-G maneuver along the way. While the video itself is impressive, it’s what they did to hype the video and build buzz around the campaign that got my attention.

Countdown Timer

For starters, Dunlop used the often cliché but generally effective countdown timer to tease the event, both creating a sense of anticipation, and giving viewers a firm date and time to come back and see the stunt. That way, anyone that was intrigued by the teaser videos and wanted to see more would know when to check back, and Dunlop could prevent the frustration that comes with seeing 80% of a concept, and then missing out on the final (and more interesting) 20%. Plus, as long as the teaser videos were good, the timer guaranteed that the main video would receive a bunch of additional views when it first debuted, ensuring that the start would go off with a bang, and that pass-along would occur from the very beginning, which is important when you want a video to go viral.

Though social media support was limited, Dunlop did open a DunlopLoop Twitter Account specifically for the campaign, and posted regular updates to that account in addition to their main site. At this point, a Twitter account is almost a mandatory inclusion for any interactive/online ad campaign, but it was good to see that it wasn’t neglected in this case, and was executed well. The account posted updates and replied to any reactions, and while the response wasn’t great, it was good bang-for-the-buck, and showed that Dunlop cared about influential viewers who are willing to share the video (and their opinion) with others.

To add to the credibility of the event, and to tie the campaign to a group of target-specific celebrities, Dunlop also teamed up with the British automotive show Fifth Gear to create the concept. By doing this, they were able to use the personalities from the show to build buzz and tap into a pre-existing audience for a guaranteed number of viewers that would watch the video regardless of additional support. Too often, endorsements and partnerships end once the cameras start rolling, but when everyone and everything has its own on-line fan club, it’s important for companies to realize that they need to tap into those communities and make the cross-promotion a part of the deal.

Beyond the stunt and the videos that went along with it, the campaign was kept to a minimum, but that doesn’t mean there was a shortage of ideas for how to increase the exposure and extended the campaign into additional channels. For one, they could have followed BMW’s lead with the Rampenfest campaign and created a Facebook Page to generate buzz around the stunt and increase the “Real or Fake?” debate. Secondly, they could have created an advergame to allow viewers to attempt their own stunt in a Dunlop branded car. Lastly, they could have done a ‘remix you own ad’ style campaign where viewers are given a number of camera angles and clips of the stunt and the ability to stitch them together in any way that they liked, and then the winning edit is shown on TV.

For a small video campaign however, the Dunlop Loop-the-Loop was a smart and solid idea that managed to do a lot with a little, and made tires a hot topic on a large number of blogs, which is no easy task.

The Good:

  • Uses a world record to draw in viewers and create a spectacle.
  • Demonstrates a very boring product in a very exciting way.
  • Used a countdown timer effectively to build buzz.

The Bad:

  • Campaign wasn’t extended into other social media channels.

The Future:

  • Stunts allow boring brands to entertain viewers and make their products exciting while still showing features and benefits and driving sales.

Dunlop – Loop-the-Loop